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There’s No Need for a Snaggletooth

THE UPPER CANINE TOOTH, cuspid tooth, or pointed “eye tooth” is the last front tooth to come into the front upper dental arch. When space runs out, this gets pushed out of position. This tooth may become impacted in bone, stuck, and not come in at all. Or, it may push its way out and over the other teeth making its way into the dental arch. It is now hypererupted. It appears as a “Snaggletooth.”

Dental Arch Expansion Can Prevent A Snaggletooth

If orthodontic treatment is started early, dental arches can be expanded to prevent the creation of a snaggletooth. This is why the American Association of Orthodontists and all orthodontists recommend an orthodontic examination by age 7.

In Some Cases, Tooth Extraction Is Necessary

In adults, depending on bone, soft tissue or gums, tooth position and facial appearance, snaggletooth treatment may require tooth extraction. The snaggletooth is a very important tooth with a long root. It is usually the tooth behind it which need removal.

We Love Helping Our Patients Make The Most Of Their Smiles!

To find out how orthodontics can help you prevent snaggletooth in the first place, visit Gorczyca Orthodontics in Antioch, California. Please schedule your child’s examination by age 7. Find us at www.clubbraces.com or call us at (925) 757-9000 for a complimentary exam.

See your orthodontist if you need help with a Snaggletooth. Here’s to your happiness and living snaggle free.

Top image by Flickr user Mark Anderson used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

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